Details - International Climate Initiative (IKI)

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As of: January 2018

ADVANCING THE MICRONESIA CHALLENGE THROUGH NEW PROTECTED AREAS


Objective and activities

Island states such as the Marshall Islands, the Republic of Palau and the Federated States of Micronesia face particularly dire threats from the impacts of climate change. In 2006, the presidents of these three nations along with the government leaders of the US territories of Micronesia signed the ‘Micronesia Challenge’ with the goal of conserving 30% of near-shore coastal waters and 20% of their land area by the year 2020. The project supported efforts to implement the Micronesia Challenge by designating protected areas. The project was intended to secure the local communities’ ownership of their resources and their control over those resources. Further, local institutions that implemented these measures and commited to sustainable, socio-economic development in the region received legal aid in support of their efforts.

State of implementation/results

  • Project completed
  • Adaptation to rising sea levels: a management plan based on ecotourism has been developed for the Yela Swamp Forest with the relevant stakeholders
  • Protection of coastal zones: measures to increase resilience have been integrated into the management plans of six coral reefs in Palau
  • Water-saving measures: seven of the ten states of Babeldaob (Palau) have signed the Babeldaob Watershed Agreement
  • Management of invasive species: stakeholders drawn from the Federated States of Micronesia, the Marshall Islands and Palau have been trained in the design and implementation of projects to combat invasive plant species

Project data

Country:
Federated States of Micronesia, Marshall Islands, Palau

Implementing organisation:
The Micronesia Conservation Trust (MCT)

Partner institution(s):
The Nature Conservancy (TNC) - Federated States of Micronesia

BMUB grant:
€ 1,551,738.97

Duration:
12/2008 till 12/2010

Website(s):



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